iamawildchild:

The wisdom Di left behind.

iamawildchild:

The wisdom Di left behind.


Everyone needs to be valued. Everyone has the potential to give something back.

(Source: leonore-of-sweden)


If it is right, it happens — the main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away.
Angel and the City ...: My Dining Experience With Casa Botín Restaurant

angelandthecity:

Casa Botín is definitely a one of a kind restaurant located at Madrid, Spain. Me and the boyf got the chance to visit the world famous restaurant and tried out some of their specialties. The overall experience is definitely great and quite historical as well.


First and foremost, let me…

(Source: angelandthecity)


jackandjackie:

“If you cut people off from what nourishes them spiritually, something in them dies” ~ Jacqueline Kennedy

jackandjackie:

“If you cut people off from what nourishes them spiritually, something in them dies” ~ Jacqueline Kennedy



holmmes:

upperstories:

uwaaaah:

zoophobiacrazies:

GUYS

SOMEONE

REDID TOY STORY 

WITH ACTUAL TOYS

THE WHOLE MOVIE

A+++++ FOR FUCKING EFFORT MAN

everyone go home. pool’s closed.

we as a species have accomplished everything we could possibly accomplish now.

image

THIS IS FREAKING EPIC.

(Source: vivzie-pop, via disneyforeverlives)



positive-mojo:

the last one tho…

(via ohtheloci)


1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle.
But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon?
In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1.
We still want to keep using the angle from the x-axis as the function’s input, instead of the distance along the polygon’s boundary. (These are only the same value for the circle!) This is why the square does not trace a straight diagonal line, as you may expect, but a segment of the tangent function. In other words, the speed of the dot around the polygon is not constant anymore.
Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon.
More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post
Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like.
This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle.

But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon?

In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1.

We still want to keep using the angle from the x-axis as the function’s input, instead of the distance along the polygon’s boundary. (These are only the same value for the circle!) This is why the square does not trace a straight diagonal line, as you may expect, but a segment of the tangent function. In other words, the speed of the dot around the polygon is not constant anymore.

Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon.

More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post

Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like.

This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

(via ohtheloci)


(Source: appleday)


disney:

Sometimes there’s beauty in seeing the forest for the trees.

disney:

Sometimes there’s beauty in seeing the forest for the trees.


(via premna)


There are all kinds of love in this world, but never the same love twice.

(Source: brutalgeneration, via svyx)


americasgreatoutdoors:

Sometimes there are no words to describe the view in our national parks. This photo from Arches National Park is no exception.Photo: Jacob W. Frank 

americasgreatoutdoors:

Sometimes there are no words to describe the view in our national parks. This photo from Arches National Park is no exception.

Photo: Jacob W. Frank